mouvement éthique mondial

Statement and explanation of the principles

behind the World Ethical Movement (Mémo)

[Français]

The World Ethical Movement (Mémo — Mouvement éthique mondial) brings together everyone who wants or wishes to work to change the world and who cherishes the highest ideal of respect for people and their autonomy. Mémo was conceived as a zero exclusion ethic involving information communication technologies in order to recognize and defend all those who are excluded worldwide.

Firstly: what is respect?

Respect, by definition, involves recognizing a person, religious group or nation as such, alongside a helpful attitude which involves trying to help this person or these groups, insofar as is possible, to undertake or pursue their own development in an autonomous way. A person is only fully respected if his primary group of belonging (the group with which he identifies the most and of which he most wants to be a member) is itself respected, regardless of whether the latter is particularly religious or national. It is important to understand that respecting a person does not mean accepting all his ideas or opinions. Instead it involves leading him to modify these if this is more in keeping with respect for others. The same is true of religions or nations: Some types of beliefs or behaviors may need to be corrected, dismissed, abandoned or modified[1].

Mémo principles

Ethical action is defined here as an action for and through respect. We must work to properly understand and apply four major base principles:

P1        The principle of recognizing any person as such

P2        The principle of recognizing the group (nation, religious group, etc.) to which this person belongs, whatever that group

P3        The principle of helping this person so that he might develop in an autonomous way

P4        The principle of helping the group to which this person belongs so that it might develop in an autonomous way

The first principle (P1) means recognizing any person as being a person in the full sense of the term, i.e. as a person who is equal to any other person. This in turn involves fully recognizing the primary group to which any person belongs as such, i.e. the group to which this person wishes to belong more than to any other group. In particular, this could be his nation or religious group. In this sense, the second principle (P2) follows logically from P1.

N.B.: One application of P2 was made in the form of a world referendum with the aim of recognizing all nations and creating a Society of All Nations, or STN (Société de Toutes les Nations): World Referendum for an STN.

The third principle (P3) involves helping any person to develop, insofar as is possible, as an autonomous person or with a view to becoming autonomous. It also involves helping the priority membership group of this person to develop, insofar as is possible, as an autonomous group or with a view to becoming autonomous.[2]. In this sense, the fourth principle (P4) follows logically from P3.

Some implications of Mémo principles:

The universal character of these principles follows from their formulation:

U1       It follows logically from P1 that all people are equal: women and men, homosexuals and heterosexuals, « offenders » and non-offenders, etc. They are all individuals in the full sense of the term regardless of their differences.

U2       It is important to recognize, according to P2, that all groups are equal, no matter how small, weak or poor they may be.

U2.1    All nations are equal, no matter how small, weak or poor they may be.

U2.2    All religious groupsare equal, no matter how small, weak or poor they may be.

In addition, the active nature of these principles follows from the principles of education regarding respect:

A1       All human beings should, insofar as is possible, be helped in their personal development; in no case should the personal development of any human be hindered arbitrarily or in the name of any moral whatsoever, whether this is as an « abnormal » or « sick » human or as an « offender ».

A2       All human groups (i.e. primary membership groups such as nations, religious groups, etc.) should, insofar as is possible, be helped in their autonomous development; in no case should the autonomous development of any group be hindered arbitrarily or in the name of any moral whatsoever, whether this is as an « abnormal », « backward » or « offending » group, etc.

A2.1    We must work towards mutual respect for nations. This involves nations mutually recognizing each other as such, in the full sense of the term, and seeking to help one another rather than to undermine each other.

A2.2    Likewise, we must work towards mutual respect for religious groups. This involves religious groups mutually recognizing each other as such, in the full sense of the term, and seeking to help one another rather than to undermine each other.

A3       Humans should be actively helped to stop denigrating, belittling or misjudging other humans without sufficient reason.

A3.1    We should examine and evaluate the views expressed by others, whatever these may be, it being understood that any criticism should be made within the framework of the joint search for common ground.

A3.2    Moreover, in order to respect others in general, we should not seek to revile any person or group.

A4       PAMs (Pédagogies Agissant sur le Monde — pedagogies affecting the world) are, just like Mémo, new ways to work toward the universal respect of any person and his group. A PAM is a form of pedagogy using the Internet in order to establish an idea, an entity or a project through mutual ethical recognition or, more broadly, through mutual respect, and which, in doing so, has an effect on the world. It is a creative pedagogy on a global scale.

Here are the titles (and the links) to some PAMs:

Open letter to feminists: Venir en aide aux femmes maltraitées du monde entier (Providing assistance to mistreated women around the world)

Open letter to Muslims: L’islam, pourquoi pas? (Islam, why not?)

World referendum for a Society of All Nations (STN): Fonder une nouvelle « ONU », où toutes les nations seraient reconnues et traitées également (Founding a new « United Nations », where all the nations would be recognized and treated equally)

Open letter to partisans of Quebec sovereignty: Faire de la question du Québec une question d’intérêt planétaire (Making the Quebec question one of global interest)

Open letter to politicians: Répondre à l’urgence climatique… (Responding to the climate emergency…)

Open letter to Catholics: Redonner sens au catholicisme (Restoring meaning to Catholicism)

Manifesto for global long term progressivism: Pour un progressisme à la fois efficace et respectueux de tous (For progressivism that is efficient whilst respecting everyone)

 

 

Sorry. Please complete the French inscription formJoin the World Ethical Movement (Mémo):As a member of Mémo, you agree to respect people and groups as defined and explained above, to publicize this Movement and to encourage other people to join it. To mark your decision to become a member, all you need do is fill in this form and confirm:

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NB: The person behind MÉMO is Yvon Provencal (2013). As a teacher of philosophy in Quebec, it is my responsibility to educate citizens on issues that are fundamental to society in Quebec and to societies around the world in general.

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1.  Reference texts and works: Le respect des personnes et des groupes dans leur autonomie (Respecting people, groups and their autonomy), Éclaircissement sur le respect des groupes (Clarification on respecting groups), Le Projet Respect (The Respect Project)and La diabolisation (Demonization). Une pédagogie de l’éthique (Ethical pedagogy)Le respect de la différence (Respecting differences). Also see: Qu’est-ce qu’une PAM? (What is a PAM?) and, in particular, the Référendum pour une Société de Toutes les Nations (Referendum for a Society of All Nations) ↑ 

2.  The concept of autonomy is not self-evident. Its meaning is analytically specified in Agorathèque: « Respecting people, groups and their autonomy. » ↑